Civil society is at a crossroads. We face mounting challenges, from growing inequality to climate change. This is allied to an upsurge in people wanting to get involved. We want to strengthen civil society’s ability to bring about change. Get it right and we can change the world for the better.

Led by The Sheila McKechnie Foundation, the Social Change Project is open to anyone with an interest in civil society and social change.

 

Phase one (April to October 2017)

A series of workshops considered the drivers of and barriers to social change. We began researching existing literature on social change and looking at case studies, from living wage to equal marriage. From this, we identified a number of ‘burning issues’ (below)

Phase Two (October 2017 to February 2017)

More in-depth exploration of the ‘burning issues’, and generating further learning and insights from different instances of change.

Phase Three (February 2017 onwards)

We will work with contributors to identify common themes and recommendations. All those involved in the project will be invited to a one-day event to share our learning and feed into the final report.

There’s still time to contribute!

If you have an interest in social change, please join us as we enquire and explore together. You can:

 

The ‘burning issues’

We welcome your ideas about what has (and hasn’t) worked around any of these issues. We have already published an interim report and various blogs.

 Models of social change – knowing what works
 Making better use of the law
 Leadership
 Unlocking the power of people
 Collaborations – coalitions, networks and alliances
 Moral purpose, ethics and integrity
 Organisations structures, governance and leadership
 Evaluating and measuring social change
 Creativity
 The future use of digital tools

The Sheila McKechnie Foundation is primarily the thought convenor and catalyst for discussion. We have our own thoughts and will be actively contributing to the project, as well as encouraging others to get involved.


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